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Thread: Garden Pond advice

  1. #1
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    Default Garden Pond advice

    My new house has a pond in the garden, pretty much ready to go once I've replaced the liner and some of the stones. It's about 785 gallons in size, so not huge.

    I've had a look online at the different filter systems, pumps, etc. I'm conscious of cost, so I wondered what the best way to ensure I have a clean, sustainable pond without going mad and spending too much money (at the moment, anyway). Could anyone recommend a good filtration/pump that isn't going to be too costly?

    I am only planning to have a few small carp in their initially, but doubt I will ever have much more than 10 fish in there.

    Absolute novice when it comes to this so any advice would be very welcome

    Thanks

    L

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    Frequent User Croxie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lol View Post
    My new house has a pond in the garden, pretty much ready to go once I've replaced the liner and some of the stones. It's about 785 gallons in size, so not huge.

    I've had a look online at the different filter systems, pumps, etc. I'm conscious of cost, so I wondered what the best way to ensure I have a clean, sustainable pond without going mad and spending too much money (at the moment, anyway). Could anyone recommend a good filtration/pump that isn't going to be too costly?

    I am only planning to have a few small carp in their initially, but doubt I will ever have much more than 10 fish in there.

    Absolute novice when it comes to this so any advice would be very welcome

    Thanks

    L
    Hi
    I would go for a 3 bay filter system, should be able to pick one up for around 100 (did see one the other day for 60!) Kockney Koi are a good bet. You will also need a UV otherwise your water will be pea green, pump wise again second hand get a fairly powerful one which will then mean that you have a good flow on the pond.

    Hope that helps!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Croxie View Post
    Hi
    I would go for a 3 bay filter system, should be able to pick one up for around 100 (did see one the other day for 60!) Kockney Koi are a good bet. You will also need a UV otherwise your water will be pea green, pump wise again second hand get a fairly powerful one which will then mean that you have a good flow on the pond.

    Hope that helps!
    It does - thanks mate

  4. #4
    Elite (Gold) JSlinn's Avatar
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    And a plastic or metal Heron

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    Moderator Hippy's Avatar
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    Ensure you understand how a filter system works - most people assume it's filtering and cleaner the water physically (sifting large lumps of muck) but the biological aspect is equally, if not more,important. Essentially, you are providing a home for bacteria, which will digest the biological waste and thus prevent unwanted/toxic chemicals building up in the water. Lots of porous rock, brushes, foams and segments of pipe are common for biological filters and provide the surfaces for the bacteria to live on. When you clean your filter, DON'T clean these more than a rinse with some pond water to remove anything clogging or you will kill your bacteria! The bigger the filter, and the more volume it has, the more efficiently it will do this job. Most filter are sold with a capacity on. Ignore this, as it is the absolute most they can cope with, and they will either clog up or need clearing very often. I have a 2000gallon pond with a filter rated for 8000 and it gets a clean out every spring, once a year! A UV filter will definitely be useful - they kill water borne algae and stop the water going green.

    Spend money on a decent pump, cheap ones clog readily, and are a pain to clean. a useful tip is that there are usually lots on eBay, and people don't want to post - search on eBay and sort the results "nearest first" and you can pick up a bargain. My second pond is powered by 300 worth of pump and filter that I paid 20 for!

    Bear in mind normal carp, whilst they might appeal to the angler in you, are boring as hell! They can be tricky to spot and you might want to add a few more ornamental varieties. I would also advise netting the pond as the only failsafe way of keeping predators off - plastic herons just advertise that there's food there, and once the first heron challenges the plastic one for territory, it'll win!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hippy View Post
    Ensure you understand how a filter system works - most people assume it's filtering and cleaner the water physically (sifting large lumps of muck) but the biological aspect is equally, if not more,important. Essentially, you are providing a home for bacteria, which will digest the biological waste and thus prevent unwanted/toxic chemicals building up in the water. Lots of porous rock, brushes, foams and segments of pipe are common for biological filters and provide the surfaces for the bacteria to live on. When you clean your filter, DON'T clean these more than a rinse with some pond water to remove anything clogging or you will kill your bacteria! The bigger the filter, and the more volume it has, the more efficiently it will do this job. Most filter are sold with a capacity on. Ignore this, as it is the absolute most they can cope with, and they will either clog up or need clearing very often. I have a 2000gallon pond with a filter rated for 8000 and it gets a clean out every spring, once a year! A UV filter will definitely be useful - they kill water borne algae and stop the water going green.

    Spend money on a decent pump, cheap ones clog readily, and are a pain to clean. a useful tip is that there are usually lots on eBay, and people don't want to post - search on eBay and sort the results "nearest first" and you can pick up a bargain. My second pond is powered by 300 worth of pump and filter that I paid 20 for!

    Bear in mind normal carp, whilst they might appeal to the angler in you, are boring as hell! They can be tricky to spot and you might want to add a few more ornamental varieties. I would also advise netting the pond as the only failsafe way of keeping predators off - plastic herons just advertise that there's food there, and once the first heron challenges the plastic one for territory, it'll win!
    That's great, thanks Hippy.

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    Elite (Gold) JSlinn's Avatar
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    That’s interesting that you say that about fake herons Hippy. Sounds logical enough.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hippy View Post
    and once the first heron challenges the plastic one for territory, it'll win!
    made me laugh!!

    picturing an agitated heron knocking over the plastic one and thinking its killed it!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by JSlinn View Post
    That’s interesting that you say that about fake herons Hippy. Sounds logical enough.
    I used to work in a garden center, selling fish and pond kit. We sold dozens of herons, and we had loads of people coming back to say they'd still lost fish.

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