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Thread: Predation Action Group

  1. #1
    Frequent User RUTH's Avatar
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    Default Predation Action Group

    Press Release

    The Formation of the Predation Action Group

    There is a growing feeling of concern in angling circles, particularly among those anglers concerned with salmon, barbel, carp and specialist fishing regarding the impact of predation by signal crayfish, cormorants, otters and, possibly to a lesser extent, mink on fish stocks in this country. There is a consensus that over the last 15 years the impact of cormorants on small fish in lakes and rivers has been significant. Historically otters’ main food sources have been small fish in rivers, but that food source has been seriously depleted by the impact of cormorants. As a result otters have started to look elsewhere for their food supplies and there is a growing body of evidence that their diet increasingly includes large, valuable specimen fish, including salmon, carp and barbel. The feeling is that it is no coincidence that the impact of otters has coincided with the policy of rearing them in captivity and releasing them into the wild, with little or no regard for a prior assessment of the food sources available to them.
    Following a series of public and private meetings between interested parties the Predation Action Group has been formed. At this stage the aims of the group are simply to make a serious study of the impact of predators on fish stocks with a view to preparing a report on the subject. The Action Group needs support on two fronts, firstly in terms of reports from anyone who has suffered at the hands (claws or beaks) of predators, and secondly in terms of financial support. Hopefully the Action Group will be able to put together a strong enough case to convince higher authorities that predators are indeed having a serious impact on fish stocks and that the future of angling in some locations is under threat. If you feel you can help than we need to hear from you. This is a serious issue and one which needs addressing urgently.
    The committee representing the Predator Action Group consists of: Chairman, Danny Fairbrass, Mike Heylin of the Angling Trust, plus Ruth Lockwood of ECHO, John Wilson MBE, Martin Bowler, Keith Wesley, Chris Logsdon, John Slader of the Salmon and Trout Association, Tony Gibson, Martin Read, Dave Goodwin and Press Officer Tim Paisley.
    You can communicate with the Predation Action Group via email at: [email protected]predationactiongroup.co.uk or by post at: Predation Action Group PO Box 6313, Essex SS14 0HW.
    All communications will be treated in confidence, if requested, but it is essential that we gather as much scientific and anecdotal material as possible about the impact of predators to enable us to prepare a comprehensive report for submission to the Angling Trust, the Environment Agency and Government departments. There is a growing body of evidence that predators are killing angling. If you can help by presenting scientific or anecdotal evidence, including pictures, or giving financial support then please get in touch with us.
    Yateley Angling Centre
    GU46 7UN
    01252 861955

  2. #2
    Beginner Member DubYes's Avatar
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    Ruth, hi

    I came across Abby when I took my granddaughter to an openday at Cambridge Uni. .anglia.ac.uk/ruskin/en/home/faculties/fst/departments/lifesciences/research/volunteers_needed.html. She had handouts on identifying and killing alien crayfish. Good luck
    Last edited by Stoney; 05-02-2012 at 08:14.

  3. #3
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    the rspb, lauded by the many as a shining example in longevity, and attracting members, preaches about the welfare of our feathered friends,
    yet remains stum about the 6 million domestic cats that prey on the estimates of between 9 and 30 million birds
    people invest their hard earned, and time in feeding tables etc, yet find legislation to remedy the situation unpallatable
    if they aint prepared to protect what gets predated upon in their garden, why would they support something to protect fish, particularly if it involves culling

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    Hi, That will really help us all. I am going to check out the rest of this post now...

  5. #5
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    This is a post that I made a little earlier this evening on BFW

    I appreciate that this post has focused on otter predation or not and has made the odd reference to cormorants. Close to where I live is a lake. In the middle of the lake is a small island with a barren tree. On the tree roosts 42 cormorants that's 42lb of fish a day, 294lb a week, 1176lb a month. That is not sutainable. Some of these fish that are being consumed are 4oz perch, how long does it take for these perch to grow to this size? I just can't see how this level of predation can be brushed under the carpet. Chuck in an otter and a couple of EEs and all that is left is a lovely boating lake. Next thing that will be peddled about is that the EEs have no impact on our fisheries, even, how they might somehow benefit our waters, tell that to those who fish the Fenland Waters. I suspect a similar case to otter predation on the smaller rivers.

    I think that members must religiously complete cormorant sightings on Cormorantwatch. Secondly, I have spoken and written to my MP and upon invitation attended her surgery. She listened to me carefully and had done her homework. She was excellent and grasped the issue quickly. My correspondence has been copied to Richard Benyon. I believe that a face to face discussion has a great deal more impact, just as long as we are rational, provide evidence and put our case across lucidly. I don't think that we can fight on too many fronts at the same time. I would make a big push on the cormorant issue because I feel that they are far and away the most destructive predator on the scene.

    Incidentally, the RSPB, for which I have a lot of time, seem to have no issue with shooting, crows, magpies, squirrels and foxes where they are threat to the birds that they wish to protect on their santuaries. A tad hypocritical!

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