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steve123
09-06-2011, 07:16
Hi guys,
Due to present work comitments i only have time for short sessions (4-5hrs!:cry:).Anyone have any tips to maximize my chances to nick a bite also this time is resricted to daytimes im unable to get out early mornings or evening.many thanks in advance .
Steve.

jeames
09-06-2011, 07:20
find the fish......:eek:

steve123
09-06-2011, 07:25
I always have agood look around before setting up witch does paid off but was wondering if it would be worth prebaiting spots for my next visit ?usally i fish south lake so any tips for this water would be helpfull.

arcadio
09-06-2011, 08:24
I have similar circumstances - I fish a small club water and to avoid the prob of prebaiting the night before only to find some one else in the swim I stick to a small over grown swim which is a pig to cast from and has a lot of snags. I fish 1 rod only close up to the snags and usually get a pick up. On Tuesday I went for 3 hours (10 till 1) had three takes, landed one low double so I was happy. Don't think i'll ever get the larger fish on this method as I think they are in the weed in the middle but in short sessions it is better to get some action. If I were fishing a short session at South lake I would take the least tackle I could, walk around, find the fish, small pva bags and be prepared to move if I didn't get a touch in an hour and a half. In short sessions I have to be confident that the fish are nearby because there is no time to wait for them to show so I am always ready to move. Not sure I'd bother prebaiting South Lake unless it was the night before as I get the impression (only fished there a few times in last few years) that those fish move all over the lake.

These are just my thoughts - no doubt others will have their opinions.

Slim75
09-06-2011, 09:09
In some cases you can actually be at a massive advantage fishing short sessions like this.

Firstly you can stay highly mobile, spend the first hour of any session walking the lake. If nothing shows after the first half an hour dont loose heart and keep looking. Its a cliche but 1 hour in the right spot is better than 10 in the wrong.

Secondly if its at all possible try and time your visits with any significant changes in the weather, simple stuff like a drop in pressure and a new SW Wind will, on most lakes push the fish on the end of the wind.

Lastly try and minimise the kit you take to the bare minimum that is still safe (for the fish that is). I really focuses you a lot more if you have limited time to fish, you get better at everything including bait placement, casting etc. Handfuls of bait in the right spot, fishing for a single bite at at time with small bags or sticks..

IMO its a great way of fishing, if you keep it up the results can be amazing. Dropping in to a swim and having a fish after 30 mins when the bloke on the other side of the lake has been camped there for 3 days and blanking is somehow satisfying if im honest. :notworthy: It really hones all your skills and you will learn a lot about the lake you are fishing, sometimes to a point where you can check the weather and arrive at the lake with a pretty good idea of where to look for the fish almost immedaitely...

Good luck mate :thumbs:

Comfortably_Numb
09-06-2011, 12:14
Ditch carp & head off down the river with a stick float :)

common
09-06-2011, 12:16
Pre bait the most unattractive swim on the lake, and fish no more than 2 rod lengths out.

Phil_Appleby
09-06-2011, 12:35
A lot of my fishing is this sort of style, early starts till lunchtime, or evenings in the summer. I would recommend...

Bait up when you leave, fish singles when you are actually fishing.

Strip your kit right down. Best weight saving tip is to dispense with cumbersome rod holdalls, your brolly, and heavy chairs. I carry my rods, the net and brolly are in a light quiver sling - will leave my brolly behind if no rain is due and carry net with rods. I use short 9" sticks that live in my rucker so my quiver's only purpose is as a device for carrying my brolly. No brolly - no quiver...

JRC X-low chairs are brilliant for short trips, mega light, about half the weight of my Chub Snooper recliner day chair. Rucksack, small bait bucket, mat, job done. If I'm not using pellet I'll ditch the bucket and just put my bait and catty in my rucker. I fished a venue with a particularly long walk last week, all I had was my rucker, two rods and net in one hand, low chair in other hand and mat over shoulder.

And as mentioned above try to avoid the busier double dug-out swims. Try to get something going in the pokier out of the way type swims. Keep trickling the bait in and they'll be almost queueing up for you. Great way to fish, very satisfying to turn up at 7am, have a fish by 9am, maybe another one, then leave at lunchtime to get on with something else! :thumbs:

Bovis
09-06-2011, 12:35
Pre bait the most unattractive swim on the lake, and fish no more than 2 rod lengths out.

Hmm possibly the worst and most vague bit of advice i've seen for a while lol.. I get what you're hinting at but also i get a picture of someone taking your advice word for word and piling in kilo's upon kilo's of bait on a spot 2 yards out that is 8inches deep lol.

As others have said, be mobile, location is the number one priority, even if you walk around for a few hours to find something, it only takes 10 minutes to get a bite - NEVER consider time looking as time wasted!

If you're pre-baiting a swim then you'll actually be making yourself feel inclined to fish in it when other area's may be better.. No harm in regularly baiting a spot or 2 as a fall back place to fish if their proving hard to find, i personally allways find though if i'm regularly baiting a spot that its hard not to fish on it when you get to the pond - not allways a welcome distraction i find as much as pre-baiting can be devastating in the right circumstances.

My best bit of advice - certainly for the next 3 months would be take some floaters regularly and try to get them off top... Its fascinating the amount of times you can go and sneak a few off the top on a quiet week evening in a few hour session whilst one or 2 on the pond are sitting blanking on the bottom

If i had to compare results over the past 2 years in terms of hours fished and fish caught, between bottom fishing and surface fishing, i'd say the results are quiet frightening, and i reckon surface wise i get a fish every 2-3 hours on average, whereas bottom fishing would be at most a fish per 48 hours.

Food for thought perhaps!!??

steve123
09-06-2011, 15:22
Thanks for all the advice guys. Hopefully ill have some pics to post soon!

bens5world
09-06-2011, 16:38
Pretty much all that's been said is spot on. My fishing became restricted by time and location restraints a few seasons ago and I had to completely change my approach to carp fishing. My setup has been a constant evolution but I now travel super light and devote a lot of time to fish location. Its been said so many times but it really is the key. If I judge my ability by the results I have achieved in this time, I would say that taking this new approach has made me a much better angler. Nothing beats stumbling across a group of mooching fish and you know it's on! Nothing gets the adrenaline going faster.

Good luck mate.

Barbus59
09-06-2011, 17:06
Here's a tip I came across by accident. I can only fish short day sessions. If you can go on a Sunday evening or Monday morning and you don't see any fish, then drop into a popular weekend swim. It's odds on a lot of bait has been put out over the weekend and much of it is probably still there on the bottom. Mr Carp comes along, deems it safe after 3 days of it sitting there and has a good munch. Just fish a single bait with say a small bag or stringer.
Worth bearing in mind.
Dave

wonkypod
10-06-2011, 21:23
dont forget the floaters ;)

Dan_H
10-06-2011, 21:51
Finding fish can be easy sometimes or nigh on impossible and once found is not a gaurantee you will catch them. If you do find fish feeding note the spot and build up a knowledge of known feeding areas this way you can plot your way around with a bit of purpose.

This don't mean you stop looking for new spots as this will just be counter productive. I have seen many a fish caught from just a show and sometimes that is all you will get but I have also seen people fish to a sighting when all the fish was doing was passing through.

As said before fish for one bite at a time as baiting a swim prior to you getting there is a risky business and will see you keep going back to the baited spots without giving other areas a chance.

I hope this makes sense?

Dan

mark100
10-06-2011, 22:35
In some cases you can actually be at a massive advantage fishing short sessions like this.

Firstly you can stay highly mobile, spend the first hour of any session walking the lake. If nothing shows after the first half an hour dont loose heart and keep looking. Its a cliche but 1 hour in the right spot is better than 10 in the wrong.

Secondly if its at all possible try and time your visits with any significant changes in the weather, simple stuff like a drop in pressure and a new SW Wind will, on most lakes push the fish on the end of the wind.

Lastly try and minimise the kit you take to the bare minimum that is still safe (for the fish that is). I really focuses you a lot more if you have limited time to fish, you get better at everything including bait placement, casting etc. Handfuls of bait in the right spot, fishing for a single bite at at time with small bags or sticks..

IMO its a great way of fishing, if you keep it up the results can be amazing. Dropping in to a swim and having a fish after 30 mins when the bloke on the other side of the lake has been camped there for 3 days and blanking is somehow satisfying if im honest. :notworthy: It really hones all your skills and you will learn a lot about the lake you are fishing, sometimes to a point where you can check the weather and arrive at the lake with a pretty good idea of where to look for the fish almost immedaitely...

Good luck mate :thumbs:

Couldn't of said it better myself, much prefer this type of fishing now, you do need to find the right type of water though.