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Wrighty
15-10-2009, 17:13
Might be a silly question but Im gonna ask anyway.

I have a Nikon D60 and have just bought a wireless remote.

How does one, hold a fish and press the button on the remote easily, any tips useful hints for doing this. :confused: :confused:

Benny_the_bream
15-10-2009, 20:44
I use a wired one and set up focus etc.. without the fish and then when the fish is on the mat press the button in which can hold itself down and chuck it on the floor pick the fish up while the camera clicks away.
Maybe you have a setting whereby the camera will take several photos with one click? (I have a sony so unsure of nikon settings) or buy a cheap 5m wired release.

mr_penetrator
16-10-2009, 05:46
wrighty, can you set yours to give approx a 2 second delay while you drop the remote? I also keep the remote in a hook packet to keep it dry.

Wrighty
16-10-2009, 06:45
wrighty, can you set yours to give approx a 2 second delay while you drop the remote? I also keep the remote in a hook packet to keep it dry.

I'll have a look into that, hook packet is a good idea, I had a couple of fish on Wednesday night and one slapped the remote out of my hand with his tail, spent a good 20 mins fumbling around in the dark trying to locate the remote. :bonk:

RobThomo
16-10-2009, 09:33
I used to hold the remote and fish at the same time but have started to use a 10 second delay, fire remote, pick fish up, take snap and repeat, much easier

gloucesteroldspot
16-10-2009, 10:11
I'll have a look into that, hook packet is a good idea, I had a couple of fish on Wednesday night and one slapped the remote out of my hand with his tail, spent a good 20 mins fumbling around in the dark trying to locate the remote. :bonk:

That happened to me a few weeks back; a tail swipe sent the remote flying. Luckily I noted where it entered the bushes and managed to locate it.

I confess I still hold the fish and fire the remote at the same time. It's a fiddly old business, made worse by the miniature size of the remote for my camera (400D) as you have to get it positioned just so to be able to press the button. I've been told to get one of the programmable remotes, which I'll probably do one day, but to be honest I'd be just as happy with a 5m cable release.

RobThomo
16-10-2009, 10:20
Oh yeah I use a little resealable bag for the remote, I get the impression it wouldn't take much damp to do it some damage

Tuttifrutti
16-10-2009, 10:35
Oh yeah I use a little resealable bag for the remote, I get the impression it wouldn't take much damp to do it some damage

Rob, I thought you had a Canon S5IS mate?

gloucesteroldspot
16-10-2009, 10:36
Oh yeah I use a little resealable bag for the remote, I get the impression it wouldn't take much damp to do it some damage

Really should do that with mine, but keep forgetting until I get a fish on the mat, and then it's not really a good time to be fishing about in tackle boxes for an empty hook packet! However, mine's been in the lake more than once and often gets dropped onto the mat where water has pooled, yet it still works fine. I guess it depends which one you've got; mine's the Canon RC5.

Tuttifrutti
16-10-2009, 10:47
When I first bought a digi camera it was a Minolta one and had a wired remote. What I did was sellotaped something (might have been a small piece of rubber) to the actual button on the remote and then wrapped in an old rod band to keep it from getting muddy. I then had the camera set to take single shots and the "wrapped" remote was right by my foot. As soon as the fish was raised for the shot I would depress my foot onto the remote and take the shot. I could then just keep wiggling my foot and take as many as I liked and then do the same for the other side. This worked really well :)

RobThomo
16-10-2009, 10:49
No i've got a Pro 1 Ian, re-assuring news about the damp remote coz me being me the bag will eventually fall to bits before I replace it!

Wrighty
16-10-2009, 11:39
Theres me thinking I would get slated for this thread, seems its a common problem.

Will look into the 10 second delays on the timer for sure.

Les_Paul
17-10-2009, 07:35
Always found it easier to use timer delay than a remote, also remotes are easy to damage an lose. If your cam has custom modes you can set one up to timer delay and flash which would cover most situations day and night and you would never have to dial the settings in again as they are saved. Most compacts go pretty wide so negating the need for flip screen, take a test shot and when it comes to the trophy shot you pretty much know where to be in the general area.

Tim_Kelly
17-10-2009, 08:01
The trouble with self timer pics is that the camera tends to focus when you press the release button to start the countdown, rather than just before it takes the picture. This can lead to you being totally out of focus if the camera's focused on something in the distance.

willowsage
17-10-2009, 10:55
Gloucesteroldspot will be running for cover about now, as I keep banging on about the programmable remote I have.
My camera is an Eos 350D, but I know they do them for most DSLR's and a fair few of the Top end compacts.
It cost 25 quid, and you can set it to take one shot after a set delay time, and then another at preset intervals up to however many shots in total you want. Plug in, push button and away you go.

If you google timer remote shutter cable or try this link. Not spamming mods, just trying to help out!
http://cgi.ebay.com.my/Timer-Remote-Shutter-TC-C1-60E3-For-Canon-EOS-400D-350D_W0QQitemZ180393480761QQcmdZViewItemQQptZUK_Ph otography_DigitalCamAccess_RL?hash=item2a004a1239&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14

The link is for the Eos one but gives you a starting point

winkler
21-10-2009, 19:23
Might be a silly question but Im gonna ask anyway.

I have a Nikon D60 and have just bought a wireless remote.

How does one, hold a fish and press the button on the remote easily, any tips useful hints for doing this. :confused: :confused:

This just takes some practice, it's easy once you get the hang of it, i assume you got the ml l3, so worth wrapping in cling film first, then tape a wrist loop on to the end. this way you wont lose it.. It's worth practising holding an object similar size and ensure that the focusing settings are on the fish, not you, as this is important. Shoot around f5.6 to f8. Fill flash is beneficial also. I usually hold the remote in the tail hand, as i find this much easier. The ml l3 is quite slim so maybe worth trying it between your fingers instead of finger and thumb?

I self take most of the time, partly cos i fish alone, got no mates anyway, and partly cos i don't trust others with a camera much! managed to get great shots with fish to 43 on my todd..

Mr_Bump
21-10-2009, 19:35
Use a laccy band to hold the remote to your finger/thumb, you wont lose it then ;)

Saying that I still use a bulb release.

Mr_Bump
21-10-2009, 19:38
This just takes some practice, it's easy once you get the hang of it, i assume you got the ml l3, so worth wrapping in cling film first, then tape a wrist loop on to the end. this way you wont lose it.. It's worth practising holding an object similar size and ensure that the focusing settings are on the fish, not you, as this is important. Shoot around f5.6 to f8. Fill flash is beneficial also. I usually hold the remote in the tail hand, as i find this much easier. The ml l3 is quite slim so maybe worth trying it between your fingers instead of finger and thumb?

I self take most of the time, partly cos i fish alone, got no mates anyway, and partly cos i don't trust others with a camera much! managed to get great shots with fish to 43 on my todd..
Why do you recomend such an aperture as F8?

I shoot as big as posible, leaving me and the fish in focus and not worrying about the background.

winkler
21-10-2009, 19:48
Because this is often the sharpest on kit/ lower cost lenses, below f4 can be a bit soft. Not having a background immediately behind you helps isolate the subject nicely too..

Wrighty
22-10-2009, 10:59
Because this is often the sharpest on kit/ lower cost lenses, below f4 can be a bit soft. Not having a background immediately behind you helps isolate the subject nicely too..

Ok, so Im fairly new to this. This pic was taken at 3am last week with a Nikon D60 with the standard ship lense. I used the portrait setting on the camera and standard flash. What could I do or set to make this pic look even better. (note the remote in my hand under the an4l finn :) )

http://i677.photobucket.com/albums/vv140/wrightsd106/DSC_0185-1.jpg

Mr_Bump
22-10-2009, 15:38
Don't look at the camera ;)

Tuttifrutti
22-10-2009, 16:29
Wrighty I can't see too much wrong with that mate. Looks a pretty decent attempt for a night shot. Not too much flash glare on the fish. Pretty decent. A guy I was in contact with on a photography forum sugested a few things to me which i've yet to try but they did relate to me having my DSLR and a wired remote. He said I should get the speed at 250th, the apperture around the F7/F8 mark and if I had an external flash all the better and to set it to lower power. You may be able to do that with a built in one, and finally to shoot in raw. Those settings at night would appearently make the shot come out a little dark (so there would be no flash glare on fish) and then you can tweak the levels back up on the pc after.

winkler
22-10-2009, 18:16
It's a good shot, though the camera has focused on the background, rather than the fish, so if you can get a bit more distance between you and background it will help. I'm not too up on the D60, so just looked up the focusing options. Select custom setting menu, 03 - AF area mode and set to 'closest subject', with AF assist (09) 'on'. Set the metering to centre weighted to concentrate on the fish, and use red eye reduction.

Framing is already good, maybe lose the mat, but you're doing good..
I always spend time setting up, and hold an esp towel to get the focus bang on, you should be able to view the fibres of the towel.. Then i mark where the tripod feet sit into the ground and pack it away til (IF) i need it.


Did you shoot RAW? Hope so..

Let us know how you get on, cracking common too, well done!

Ps.

Mr_Bump
22-10-2009, 18:37
Winklers got some good points, the metering does seem to have gone for a wider field than needed, you should be able to set as centre, which will focus just on you and the fish.

You could have panned up slightly but thats nothing a bit of cropping can't sort out.

RAW is a definate plus, allows for better processing in PS or the like